Susan Brown

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  • in reply to: Module 6 unit 6 question 8 #13420
    Susan BrownSusan Brown
    Keymaster

    Just in case, here are the answer choices:

    • Replace both ignitors since they are obviously bad.
    • Replace the electronic relay board because it’s obviously bad.
    • Turn on broil and see if you’re getting 120 vac from P21-1 to P1-N on the electronic control board.
    • Disassemble the oven to get access to the gas valve and see if it’s getting voltage.
    • Turn on broil and see if you’re getting 120 vac from P20-2 to P1-N on the electronic control board.
    • See if you’re getting 120 vac from P20-2 to P21-1 on the electronic relay board with both bake and broil turned on.
    in reply to: How do I solve this problem. #13417
    Susan BrownSusan Brown
    Keymaster

    Unit 3, “Measuring Gas Pressure”

    in reply to: Reset all quizzes while still maintaining access? #13414
    Susan BrownSusan Brown
    Keymaster

    Hi Sallie,

    No, we aren’t able to do that.

    in reply to: Reading assignment error? #13412
    Susan BrownSusan Brown
    Keymaster

    Hi Zach,

    Glad you are enjoying the course so far!

    Partway down page 253 you’ll see the section we want you to read, Circuit Protection Devices.

    in reply to: Question #13408
    Susan BrownSusan Brown
    Keymaster

    Yes, if you meet the scoring requirements (90% or higher on each quiz and exam), you’ll get a Certification for the course(s). It is not “Master Certification” however. That is only for successfully completing Bundle 1.

    in reply to: Question #13406
    Susan BrownSusan Brown
    Keymaster

    Hi Jose,

    We explain the answer to that in the first video in Unit 3, “Electrical Measurements Refresher.”

    Let me know if that doesn’t make it clear.

    Also – remember that you need to earn 90% or higher on EACH quiz in the course to earn Certification. You scored 88.9% on the second attempt at the Unit 2 quiz. Do you know how to request a reset?

    in reply to: Module 3 unit 6 #13399
    Susan BrownSusan Brown
    Keymaster

    Hi Andrew,

    #1: the correct answer is “nothing” – are you sure you chose that? In a properly grounded circuit, neutral will have ground potential. So, there is no potential difference between the neutral wire and ground, so no current would flow through you.

    #2: Same reason as #1 – neutral and ground (in a properly grounded circuit) will have no voltage difference between them. Remember that voltage readings are always a comparison between two points. If you measure L1 to neutral, you should get 120v.

    in reply to: Module 5 Unit 1 Quiz question on calculating voltage drop #13397
    Susan BrownSusan Brown
    Keymaster

    Hi David,

    In order to calculate the circuit current, you first need to know the total resistance in the load so you can do I = E/R.

    Remember the Midterm exam question about the heat generated by the loose connection? You mentally added 30 + 6 to get 36 ohms, then went on to calculate the current.

    in reply to: How do I solve this problem. #13393
    Susan BrownSusan Brown
    Keymaster

    Yes, that’s correct for Part 2 – L1 is the one with the fault. (Note: your original answer to Part 1 on the exam was correct. It could use a little more detail, but you’ve got the basics correct.)

    in reply to: How do I solve this problem. #13390
    Susan BrownSusan Brown
    Keymaster

    Reminder: the Help Page I linked you to in your Midterm Feedback email has suggested units and videos for each question.

    For #7, rewatch the videos at the end of Unit 4.

    For #9, Look at Figure 2 on the Midterm and let me know why you think it is L2 that is at fault?

    #9 midterm

    in reply to: How do I solve this problem. #13386
    Susan BrownSusan Brown
    Keymaster

    That’s correct. Note – I’ll have to hide your answer so other students won’t just be able to copy it.

    in reply to: How do I solve this problem. #13384
    Susan BrownSusan Brown
    Keymaster

    Yes – did you see my explanation above about Total resistance in series circuits vs. Equivalent resistance in parallel circuits?

    in reply to: How do I solve this problem. #13381
    Susan BrownSusan Brown
    Keymaster

    Yes, that is why its Total Resistance is 70 ohms.

    in reply to: How do I solve this problem. #13379
    Susan BrownSusan Brown
    Keymaster

    70 ohms is the answer.

    I think you are mixing up Total Resistance of loads in series with the Equivalent Resistance of loads in parallel.

    Series circuit: total resistance is the sum of all resistances (loads) in the circuit.

    Parallel circuits: equivalent resistance will always be less than the smallest of the resistances, and can be calculated with the formula
    Req = 1/(1/R1 + 1/R2 +…)

    Equivalent resistance is a way of taking two or more parallel loads/circuits and combining them into one theoretical resistance. It lets you know what the resistance of those parallel circuits are from the perspective of the power supply.

    in reply to: How do I solve this problem. #13377
    Susan BrownSusan Brown
    Keymaster

    When loads are in series, the total resistance in the circuit is just the sum of the resistances.

    You did this on Question 3 of the Midterm as part of finding the circuit current:

    I=E/R=120vac / 10+20+40=1.71 amps

    (that is copied from your answer)

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 359 total)